Libertarian right and progressive left – common ground.

Traditionally, the libertarian right and the progressive left have been something akin to mortal enemies. But that may no longer be the case. As it was put to me the other day by a friend, there is an ‘unholy alliance’ between governments and transnational corporations. This manifests in the form of lobbying, campaign donations and so on and is now widely recognised as fundamentally undermining democracy.

The progressive left tends to blame the corporations. The libertarian right tends to blame the government. But whichever way you look at it, the truth is that this ‘alliance’ must be broken. Here’s an illusatration, which has been doing the rounds, that neatly illustrates this point (albeit from a US point of view).

It should be patently clear from this diagram that the only way to solve this problem is to return power to the people. This is the common ground that is now shared by left and right.

Simpol takes the view that destructive international competition is the root cause of global problems. It causes businesses and governments alike to compete in the all powerful global markets. Simpol provides a way for the people to take back the power, to create the agenda and to drive their politicians to implement it.

It is Simpol, then, that provides the true common ground on which left and right can come together and move forward into the future.

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3 thoughts on “Libertarian right and progressive left – common ground.

  1. Hmmm…. Not fully convinced of this. After all, aren’t the libertarian right only too happy for corporations to have even more power than they do now? Isn’t that one reason they’d like governments to get out of the way?

    Whatever the truth, the reality is that destructive competition between governments to keep their national economies attractive to footloose corporations and global markets is only going to hand even more power to corporations anyway. The only question is how long it will take the libertarian right to realise that this isn’t in their interests any more than anyone else’s.

    That apart, the main opposition to the liberal left isn’t so much the Tea Party or other hard-libertarian groupings, but ordinary Republicans or Conservatives who do not see that much of the need for ever-larger government stems not from any ideological drive on the part of the left, but from a LACK of governance at the global level; a lack which then causes overwhelming problems at national and local levels which then require……more government! But of course, however hard national governments try to govern, the reality is that they’ll fail, as they already are. For only some form of GLOBAL governance can possible do the trick. In other words, if we had governance at the GLOBAL level, we could then have much LESS government at the NATIONAL level. There, perhaps, is where liberal left and conservative right would have something to agree on.

    Both right and left need to wake up to the fact that neither national governments nor corporations are in control of the problem and that it cannot be solved at a national level anyway. Only something like Simpol can solve this.

    • Hi John,

      I think that, on the important points, we are in agreement here. You said:

      the main opposition to the liberal left isn’t so much the Tea Party or other hard-libertarian groupings, but ordinary Republicans or Conservatives who do not see that much of the need for ever-larger government stems not from any ideological drive on the part of the left, but from a LACK of governance at the global level.

      I think it would be true to say that those ordinary republicans/conservatives would also be the main opposition for libertarians now as well. After they are the group in power and, from the libertarian point of view, the ‘unholy alliance’ I mentioned is entirely contrary to the libertarian ethos. So in that sense, there can be common ground, even if it is only ‘the enemy of my enemy…’

      But as it happens, I think you have slightly oversimplified the libertarian position. To my mind there is a change going on in the libertarian movement, whereby they are increasingly recognising the need for global governance, even whilst vehemently rejecting large scale government. I might write more about this in another post, as I don’t really want to write it as an epic comment. Suffice to say for now that it is summed up by your remark:

      if we had governance at the GLOBAL level, we could then have much LESS government at the NATIONAL level.

  2. Pingback: Libertarian and Socialist – allies on the political battlefield? «

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